Health

 

Bill

 Sponsor

Description

Voices is

House  Bills

HB011 Property Tax Amendments

Rep. Timothy Hawkes

Sen. Daniel Hemmert

This bill modifies the property tax valuation and appeals processes for county assessed real property.

Following

HB017 Firearm Violence and Suicide Prevention Amendments

Rep. Steve Eliason

Sen. Curtis Bramble

This bill reenacts and modifies previously sunsetted provisions relating to a voluntary firearm safety program and a suicide prevention education course. Following

HB024 Property Tax Exemptions, Deferrals, and Abatements Amendments

Rep. Steve Eliason

Sen. Daniel McCay

This bill amends provisions related to property tax exemptions, deferrals, and abatements.

Following

HB025 Tax Commission Amendments

Rep. Steve Eliason

Sen. Lincoln Fillmore

This bill modifies provisions relating to closed meetings held by the State Tax Commission.

Following

HB041 Transportation Sales Tax Amendments

Rep. Kay Christofferson

This bill modifies sales and use tax provisions relating to certain sales and use tax dedications.

Following

HB042 Utah Net Loss Effective Date Clarification

Rep. Travis Seegmiller

Sen. Curtis Bramble

This bill modifies an uncodified effective date.

Following

HB047 Early Childhood Coordination Amendments

Rep. V. Lowery Snow;

Sen. Ann Millner

This bill creates the Early Childhood Utah Advisory Council and the Governor's Early Childhood Commission.

Priority Supporting

HB049 Repatriation Transition Tax Amendments

Rep. Steve Eliason

Sen. Lincoln Fillmore

This bill modifies corporate income tax provisions relating to deferred foreign income.

Following

HB071 Health Education Amendments

Rep. Ray Ward

Sen. Todd Weiler

This bill amends provisions regarding instruction in health.

Supporting

HB087 Safe Storage of Firearms Amendments

Rep. Elizabeth Weight

This bill relates to firearm storage.

Supporting

HB092 Violence Data Study

Rep. Susan Pulsipher

This bill establishes a grant award for a violence data study. Following

HB102 Campaign Funds Uses Amendments

Rep. Stephanie Pitcher

This bill allows candidates for public office to use campaign funds to pay for child care expenses incurred as part of campaign activities. 

Supporting

HB103 Utah Intergenerational Poverty Work & Self-sufficiency Tax Credit.

Rep. Robert Spendlove

This bill enacts a state earned income tax credit.

Priority Supporting

HB120 Student and School Safety Assessment

Rep. Ray Ward

Sen. Ann Millner

This bill enacts provisions related to school safety.

Following

HB129 Campaign Amendments

Rep. Craig Hall

Sen. Deidre Henderson

This bill allows candidates for public office to use campaign funds to pay for child care expenses incurred as part of campaign activities. 

Supporting

HB153 Utah Vital Statistics Act Amendments

 Rep. Merrill Nelson

Sen.Ralph Okerlund

This bill amends provisions regarding the completion and amendment of a birth certificate.  Following
HB205 Railroad Crossing Amendments

Rep. Joel Ferry

This bill amends provisions related to the operation of a train that blocks traffic at a railroad crossing in a high-traffic area.

Following
HB208 Safe Routes to School Program

Rep. Suzanne Harrison

Sen. Daniel Hemmert

This bill requires the Department of Transportation to implement a program to provide safe routes to school.

Supporting

HB209 Extreme Risk Protective Order

Rep. Stephen Handy

This bill creates the Extreme Risk Protective Order Act.

Supporting

HB210 Medicaid Expansion Program Revisions

Rep. Ray Ward

This bill amends provisions relating to Medicaid expansion.

Priority Supporting

HB234 Marriage Amendments

Rep. Angela Romero

Sen. Luz Escamilla

This bill imposes an age, below which an individual may not marry and makes technical and conforming amendments. Following
HB244 Misdemeanor Sentencing Timeline Clarifications

Rep. Eric Hutchings 

Sen. Daniel Thatcher

This bill reduces the maximum penalty for a misdemeanor conviction by one day to 364.

Supporting

HB267 Prescription Drug Importation Program

Rep. Norman Thurston

Sen. Curtis Bramble

This bill creates a program and reporting requirements relating to prescription drugs and the importation of prescription drugs.

 

Supporting

HB274 Retail Tobacco Specialty Business Amendments 

Rep. Jennifer Dailey-Provost

This bill amends provisions relating to the sale of flavored tobacco products.

Supporting

HB275 Contraception for Women Prisoners

Rep. Jennifer Dailey-Provost

This bill requires that jails must continue to allow female prisoners access to contraceptives. Following

HB286 Financial and Economic Literacy Education Amendments

Rep. Jefferson Moss

Sen. Todd Weiler

This bill amends provisions related to financial and economic literacy education. Following
HB303 School Community Council Amendments

Rep. Keven Stratton

This bill modifies provisions related to the School LAND Trust Program.

Following

HB317 Homeless Resource Center Drug-free Zone

Rep. Steve Eliason

This bill modifies provisions related to penalties for certain prohibited acts. Following
HB324 Tobacco Age Amendments

Rep. Steve Eliason

Sen. Curtis Bramble

 This bill modifies the minimum age for obtaining, possessing, using, providing, or furnishing of tobacco products, paraphernalia, and under certain circumstances, electronic smoking devices from 19 to 20 then to 21 years of age.

Supporting

HB333 Workforce Development Incentives Amendments

Rep. Suzanne Harrison

Sen. Jacob Anderegg

This bill amends provisions related to tax credit incentives for economic development.

Supporting

HB336 Nurse Practice Act Amendments

Rep. James Dunnigan

Sen. Curtis Bramble

This bill amends provisions relating to the prescriptive authority of certain licensed nurse practitioners.

Supporting

HB340 School Absenteeism and Truancy Amendments

Rep. V. Lowry Snow

This bill amends provisions related to truancy.

Supporting

HB344 Student Asthma Relief Amendments

Rep. Mark Wheatley

Sen. Ronald Winterton

This bill enacts provisions governing the administration of stock albuterol by certain entities to an individual.

Supporting

HB360 School Water Testing Requirements

Rep. Stephen Handy 

This bill enacts provisions related to monitoring and mitigating lead in drinking water in schools and child care centers.

Supporting

HB371 Consent to Services for Homeless Youth

Rep. Elizabeth Weight

This bill relates to a homeless youth's ability to consent to a temporary shelter, care, or services.

Supporting

HB373 Student Support Amendments

Rep. Steve Eliason

Sen. Ann Millner

This bill repeals and enacts provisions related to school-based mental health support.

Supporting

HB379 Intergenerational Poverty Solution

Rep. Norman Thurston

This bill creates the Earned Income and Education Savings Incentive Program. Following
HB399 Prohibition of the Practice of Conversion Therapy upon Minors

Rep. Craig Hall

This bill prohibits certain health care professionals from providing conversion therapy to a minor; and
adds a violation of the prohibition to the list of conduct that constitutes unprofessional conduct for licensing purposes.

Followed- Bill was pulled

HB430 Prohibition of Genital Mutilation

Rep. Ken Ivory

This bill prohibits female genital mutilation and provides a penalty. Following
HB441 Tax Equalization and Reduction Act

Rep. Tim Quinn

This bill modifies the sales tax rate by attempting to broaden the tax base and lowering the income tax from 4.9% to 4.7%

Monitored - Bill was pulled.

More information here

HR003 House Resolution Supporting Humane Response to Refugee Crisis

Rep. Jen Dailey-Provost

This House resolution urges a humane response to the immigration crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Supporting

HCR004 Concurrent Resolution Supporting Utah's Every Kid Outdoors Initiative

Rep. Patrice Arent

Sen. Lincoln Fillmore

This concurrent resolution expresses support for Utah's Every Kid Outdoors Initiative.

Supporting

HCR005 Concurrent Resolution Urging Policies That Reduce Damage from Wildfires

Rep. Raymond Ward

Sen. Ronald Winterton

This resolution urges the federal government to pursue policies that allow for easier reduction of excess forest fuel loads.

Supporting

HJR008 Proposal to Amend Utah Constitution - Slavery and Involuntary Servitude Prohibition

Rep. Sandra Hollins

Sen. Jacob Anderegg

This joint resolution of the Legislature proposes to amend the Utah Constitution to modify a provision prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude.

Supporting

Senate Bills

SB012 FDIC Premium Deduction Amendments

Sen. Jerry Stevenson

Rep. Tim Quinn

This bill modifies the Corporate Franchise and Income Taxes code and the Individual Income Tax Act by amending provisions relating to certain subtractions from unadjusted income or adjusted gross income.

Following

SB013 Income Tax Domicile Amendments

Sen. Curtis Bramble

Rep. Steve Eliason

This bill modifies tax provisions relating to income tax domicile requirements.

Following

SB028 Income Tax Revisions

Sen. Curtis Bramble

Rep. Steve Eliason

This bill modifies corporate income tax provisions.

Following

SB032 Indigent Defense Act Amendments

Sen. Todd Weiler

Rep. Michael McKell

This bill amends provisions of Utah’s Indigent Defense Act to ensure appropriate legal representation for all young people appearing in juvenile court. 

Priority Supporting

SB038 Substitute Mental Health Amendments

Sen. Lincoln Fillmore

Rep. Brad Daw

This bill amends provisions of the civil commitment code and the definition of "unprofessional conduct" applied to mental health professionals.

Following

SB041 Interest Deductions Amendments

Sen. Daniel McCay

This bill modifies the Corporate and Franchise Income Tax Act and the Individual Income Tax Act by amending provisions relating to additions and deductions for certain business interest.

Following

SB042 Tangible Personal Property Amendments

Sen. Daniel McCay

Rep. Karianne Lisonbee

This bill provides for the exemption of certain tangible personal property from property tax if the tangible personal property is eligible for sales and use taxation.

Following

SB083 Partnerships for Healthy Communities

Sen. Ann Millner

Rep. Paul Ray

This bill creates the Partnerships for Healthy Communities Grant Program and will address the social determinants of health that affect early childhood health outcomes.

Priority Supporting

SB096  Medicaid Expansion Adjustments

Sen. Allen Christensen

Rep. James Dunnigan

This bill amends provisions relating to the state Medicaid program and the state sales

Opposing

SB097 Medicaid Program Revisions

Sen. Jacob Anderegg

This bill repeals the expansion of the state Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act and changes the sales tax rate.

Opposing

SB103 Victim Targeting Penalty Enhancements

Sen. Daniel Thatcher

Rep. Lee Perry

This bill enacts provisions relating to sentencing for a criminal offense committed against a victim who is selected because of certain personal attributes. Following
SB106 Mental Health Services in Schools

Sen. Lincoln Fillmore

Rep. Susan Pulsipher

This bill enacts provisions relating to coverage of certain mental health services by the Medicaid program and certain health insurers.

Following

SB110 Family Medical Unpaid Leave Amendments

Sen. Daniel Hemmert

Rep. Mike Schultz

Provides state-eligible companies (those that have between 30 and 50 employees) to make available three weeks of unpaid medical leave to employees. 

 Supporting

SB143 Public Education Vision Screening

Sen. Luz Escamilla

Rep. Brad Daw

This bill modifies provisions regarding public education vision screening.

Supporting

SB166 School Readiness Amendments

Sen. Ann Millner

Rep. Bradley Last

This bill amends and enacts preschool provisions.

Priority Supporting

SB222 Children's Outdoor Recreation Program

Sen. Lincoln Fillmore

Rep. Mike Winder

This bill creates the Utah Children's Outdoor Recreation and Education Grant Program in the Governor's Office of Economic Development.

Supporting

SJR003 Proposal to Amend Utah Constitution - Tangible Personal Property Tax Exemption

Sen. Daniel McCay

This joint resolution of the Legislature proposes to amend the Utah Constitution to modify a provision relating to tangible personal property tax exemptions.

Following

Published in Legislative Center

New Utah-specific report on ACA repeal details impact to Utah families

Salt Lake City—The number of uninsured Utah children would more than double if Congress repeals the Affordable Care Act (ACA) without a comprehensive replacement plan, according to new data released by the Urban Institute. The new data offer more detail than we’ve ever seen before about how repeal without a replacement will affect Utah children and families. As Congress and the new administration begin the process of repealing the ACA, they have yet to negotiate an agreement on a replacement and may delay doing so indefinitely.

Repealing the ACA without a replacement in place will leave even more Utah children uninsured than before the ACA came into being. While most attention has been directed toward the fact that ACA repeal could end the ACA health insurance marketplace—in itself devastating for Utah families because Utah has one of the highest marketplace enrollment rates in the nation—the ACA repeal will also affect CHIP and Medicaid, tearing away at key features of Utah’s safety net that existed long before the ACA.

All Utah families stand to lose a number of health insurance protections, not only families enrolled in the marketplace. In a letter to Congress dated January 13th, Governor Herbert and state officials expressed interest in rolling back ACA protections from insurance discrimination based on gender. In the same letter, they also supported a return to exclusions for those with pre-existing conditions. The roll-back of these ACA protections would lead to an increased medical burden for many Utah families.

The report by the Urban Institute estimated that by 2019, Utahns would see the following consequences of ACA repeal:

  • 273,000 more Utahns would become uninsured, raising Utah’s total uninsured rate from 12% to 21%.
  • 73,000 Utah children would become newly uninsured, resulting in 141,000 children without insurance. Of the Utah children who stand to lose insurance, 88% have at least one full-time working parent in the home.
  • 89,000 additional Utah parents would become uninsured, putting increased economic stress on the entire family.

“Thanks to the ACA, CHIP and Medicaid, more Utah children are insured than ever before,” said Jessie Mandle, Senior Health Policy Analyst at Voices for Utah Children. “We need a plan to build on these gains, instead of going backward.”

Read the Utah fact sheet here:
Partial Repeal of the ACA through Reconciliation: Coverage Implications for Utah Residents

The new Utah factsheet is based on research compiled by the Urban Institute in December, which was modeled on a Congressional repeal bill from 2016 similar to present Congressional proposals.
Partial Repeal of the ACA through Reconciliation: Coverage Implications for Parents and Children

Image Credit: Monkey Business Images | Dreamstime.com - Mother Taking Temperature Of Sick Daughter


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in Press Releases

The 2018 Utah Legislative Session will take place from January 22 to March 8, with 45 days chock full of long committee meetings, urgent Action Alerts, conversations between community members and legislators, demonstrations on the steps of the State Capitol Building and much more! 

We'll be following a lot of different bills during the 2018 session, not all of which will be made public before the session officially begins. Some bills are introduced with language that we support, and then that language changes over the course of the legislative process. Occasionally, the changes are subtantial enough to warrant a change in our position. We will do our best to keep this list of bills - as well as our positions - updated for your information, but it can be tricky when things are so busy for our staff during this crazy time of year. 

We are working on several bills that will be priorities for us in 2018. You can learn more about these priority legislative proposals by clicking on the topic links below. 

Children dont make the lawsTax and Budget Issues

Creating a State Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)

Restoring Investment in Children

Health Issues

12-Month Continuous Eligibility for Utah Kids with Medicaid

Maternal Health

Oral Health

Health Coverage

Early Childhood Care & Education Issues

High Quality Child Care

Governance and Coordination of Early Childcare Services

Juvenile Justice Issues

Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform

Bills

Bill & Sponsor  Voices for Utah Children Position
HB 12 "Family Planning Services Amendments," Rep. Ray Ward  Support
HB 24 "Autism Insurance Coverage Sunset Amendments," Rep. Paul Ray  Support
HB 41 "Mental Health Crisis Line Amendment," Rep. Steve Eliason Support
HB 57 "Intergenerational Poverty Work and Self-Sufficiency Tax Credit," Rep. John Westwood - IGP EITC Support
HB 64 "Distracted Driver Amendments," Rep. Carol Spackman-Moss Support
HB 123 "Child Care Licensing Amendments," Rep. Karen Kwan Following
HB 132 "Juvenile Justice Modifications," Rep. Lowry Snow Following
HB 148 "Tax Revisions," Rep. Tim Quinn - removes the remaining 1.75% state sales tax on grocery food items Support
HB 156 "Family Leave Amendments," Rep. Elizabeth Weight Support
HB 164 "Early Learning Task Force," Rep. Bruce Culter  Following
HJR 6 "Joint Resolution Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act," Rep. Gage Froer  Support
SB 31 "Utah Mobile Crisis Outreach Team," Sen. Daniel Thatcher Following
SB 48 "Medicaid Waiting Period Amendments," Sen. Allen Christensen Oppose
SB 65 "Child Neglect Amendments," Sen. Lincoln Fillmore  "Child Neglect Amendments," Sen. Lincoln Fillmore  Following

 

News Contact Lawmakers  Sign Up for E-Alerts


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

 

Published in Legislative Center

health insurance foundation

Medicaid, CHIP (the Children’s Health Insurance Program) and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) form the foundation of children’s health coverage. These programs are deeply connected to one another and our overall state safety net system. Federal and state lawmakers are proposing and enacting proposals that undermine ACA, CHIP and Medicaid. A repeal, cut or restructure of one program affects the others, and puts the care of Utah children and families at risk.

Thanks to the ACA, Medicaid and CHIP, we have seen the rate of uninsured Utah children drop from 11% in 2011 to a historic low of 6% in 2016. We cannot afford to let child health coverage, adequacy, and affordability move backwards. We must ensure that we sustain and build on our unprecedented success in covering children.

Medicaid is the cornerstone for children’s health coverage. Our state leaders must support the continued stability and affordability of the Medicaid program. Medicaid is the safety net health care program for low-income children. Over 200,000 Utah children rely on Medicaid insurance coverage, and its pediatric benefits are considered the gold standard for child health, particularly for children and youth with special health care needs. Changes to Medicaid’s financing structure through a block grant or per capita cap would undermine the program’s integrity by creating gaps in state funding. They would likely lead to limits placed on the programs, such as a reduction in benefits or fewer kids covered. Proposals to promote state innovation need to strengthen our safety net for kids and families, not weaken it.

Block grants or per capita caps would undermine Medicaid program integrity. Changes to Medicaid’s financing structure through a block grant or per capita cap would create large shortfalls in state funding. Learn more about hCoverage in Utah for kids infographicow block grants would harm Utah's budget.

Extend funding for CHIP for at least five years. A robust, long-term extension of CHIP funding for at least five years would help stabilize coverage for the 8.9 million U.S. children who rely on CHIP and provide certainty to Utah amid potentially significant changes to the broader coverage landscape. Learn more about CHIP.

Children must not lose any ground. Unraveling the ACA without a replacement plan attached threatens the health of children and families. There are 38,000 Utah children enrolled in ACA, or marketplace, coverage. At least 87% of Utahns enrolled in the exchange are receiving subsidies. The ACA provides protections for children and families, increases affordability and establishes evidence-based essential health benefits.

Extend Medicaid Coverage for Parents. Medicaid coverage for parents benefits the whole family. Yet thousands of Utah families are unable to receive Medicaid coverage, falling into the Medicaid ‘coverage gap.’ As a result, the family is at increased financial risk. Moreover, children are more likely to be uninsured. It is time to close the coverage for all parents and individuals. Learn more about citizen initiatives to close the coverage gap.

Working families depend on these vital health care programs. What is at stake if the ACA is repealed without a replacement, or changes are made to CHIP and Medicaid?

  • The number of uninsured Utah children would more than double. By 2019, at least 141,000 children would be uninsured.
  • The number of uninsured Utah parents would jump from 82,000 to 171,000. Research shows that children are better off when their parents have health insurance coverage.
  • Families and individuals would lose protection from exclusions and discrimination. Approximately 1.2 million Utahns – including 411,000 children- no longer experience lifetime limits on coverage now that the ACA is in effect.

We are putting our children’s future at risk by failing to guarantee Utah children and families have stable health insurance coverage. All children and families need consistent, comprehensive and affordable care.

Medicaid Helps Utah Children Get the Health Care They Need to Succeed from Georgetown CCF on Vimeo.

Printer-friendly Version:

pdf Preserve and Protect Health Coverage for Utah Children and Families

Additional Materials

Utah Children and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Healthcare Repeal Bill

Utah Snapshot of Children's Coverage: How Medicaid, CHIP, and the ACA Cover ChildrenHow Medicaid, CHIP, and the ACA Cover Children

In Support of Medicaid Standards for Children

Block grants or per capita caps would undermine the Medicaid program.

Number of Uninsured Utah Kids and Parents Would More than Double if ACA Repealed

The ACA Gave a Needed Boost to Utah’s Latino Child Health Insurance Rate

Tell Senator Hatch Not to Repeal the ACA without Replacing It

Defending Health Care in 2017: What Is at Stake for Utah

273,000 Utah Residents Would Lose Coverage in 2019 Under ACA Repeal2019 Under ACA Repeal

What Would Block Grants or Limits on Per Capita Spending Mean for Medicaid?

Fact Sheet: Per Capita Caps vs. Block Grants in Medicaid


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog
February 14, 2019

Healthy Moms = Healthy Kids

Maternal 1

Maternal 2

For Printable Version pdfMaternal Mental Health Support Flyer


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog

UT

Repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will cause 273,000 Utahns to lose their health insurance by 2019, new Urban Institute estimates show. Congress plans to move quickly in January to repeal much of the health reform law without enacting a replacement plan first. This would cause families in Utah to go without needed health care and expose them to financial risk. Nationally, most of the coverage loss would occur among families with at least one worker, doubling the number of uninsured and leaving a higher share of people uninsured than before the ACA.

Leaders in Congress are contemplating an unusual and risky maneuver to repeal the ACA without simultaneously passing a replacement plan. The repeal part would be easy because Congress would take advantage of special rules that apply to budget reconciliation bills. Congress could indefinately delay the far more difficult task of replacing the ACA with a new plan. 

 

Urban Social Media Shareable 2 If Congress succeeds in repealing the ACA without a replacement plan attached, they will throw the health care system into chaos. Nationwide, 4.3 million people would lose insurance right away, rising to 7.3 million by 2019.

urban institute ACA repeal

The consequences of repealing the ACA without replacing it would be dire for Utah families.

The number of uninsured Utahns would nearly double, rising from 328,000 uninsured Utahns to about 601,000.

The uninsured rate among children would more than double. Almost 38,000 Utah children currently have coverage in the ACA health insurance marketplace. These children are at risk of becoming uninsured if the ACA is repealed. After implementation of the ACA, Utah and the nation as a whole saw significant improvements in child health insurance coverage rates. Repealing the ACA without replacing it would not only eliminate these gains, but result in an even higher uninsured rate for children nationwide than existed before the ACA came into effect. 

Uninsured kids chart

Utah would lose $4.8 billion in federal funding and pay more in uncompensated care costs. State and local governments and health care providers would have to bear this cost.

Urban Social Media Shareable 1 Moderate-income working families in Utah would lose substantial financial assistance that is now available to help them pay  for their insurance premiums. The vast majority—87%—of Utahns in the ACA marketplace receive subsidies. In 2016, Utahns who enrolled in marketplace coverage receive an average advance premium tax credit of $187, which covers 69% of the total monthly premium for comprehensive coverage. 

Become Involved

Contact Senator Hatch protect our care UTAH

Tell Senator Hatch to protect our healthcare for children and families. Tell him not to repeal the ACA without a replacement bill in place to keep children and families covered by health insurance. Call Senator Hatch at (202)224-5251 or email Senator Hatch using this form.

Share Your Story

Does your family benefit from the ACA, Medicaid or CHIP health coverage? We want to talk to you. Your story could make a difference as we explain to lawmakers how repealing the ACA without replacing it could affect their constituents. Contact us.

More Information

Let’s Keep Moving Forward: The ACA’s Impact on Children’s Health Coverage

New Study Shows How ACA Repeal Would Impact Utah

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Fact Sheet: How Repeal of the ACA Would Affect Utahns

There Are 20,000 Fewer Uninsured Kids in Utah, Thanks to the Affordable Care Act


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

Published in News & Blog

Your story makes a difference.

The new administration and Congress are considering proposals that could harm Utahns enrolled in health coverage through the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Medicaid or CHIP. Are you a parent who is enrolled in one of these vital programs? Is your child enrolled? Voices for Utah Children is currently talking with Utah families with children that benefit from these programs, so that we can better communicate your needs to lawmakers. Lawmakers need to know how cuts to these programs would affect their constituents.

No long-term commitment is necessary. A member of the Voices for Utah Children team will ask you about how these health programs have helped your family and how your family would be affected if you lost your health coverage. If you give us permission, we will share your story on our website, through social media, and with lawmakers directly. Your story could be vital to saving these important programs.

You can contact Jessie Mandle, our health policy analyst, by email at  or by phone at 801-364-1182. 

You can also submit your story online here.

Are you a healthcare provider with patients that benefit from the ACA, Medicaid and CHIP?  Share your story here.


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

Published in News & Blog

continuous eligibility umbrella infographic

Utah FAQ’s

What is 12-month continuous eligibility for children on Medicaid?

Continuous eligibility is a state option that allows children, up through age 18, to maintain Medicaid coverage throughout the year, even if families experience a change in income or family status. By implementing continuous eligibility policies, a state ensures that for 365 days a year children get—and keep—health coverage.

What is churn?

“Churning” is when children are disenrolled in a public health insurance program and then re-enrolled after only a brief time without public insurance (2-6 months). “Churn” is the on-and-off-and-on pattern of enrollment that may be unrelated to actual eligibility status.

How does 12-month continuous eligibility affect families and children?

When children are enrolled in a program for 12 continuous months, they are less likely to lose their insurance coverage and more likely to experience continuity of care. In many cases, families must dis-enroll from Medicaid after securing unexpected temporary or seasonal work. When the short-term job ends, they must re-enroll in benefits. This creates an unnecessary burden for families. Parents are penalized for trying to improve their family’s economic circumstances through temporary or seasonal work.

How does 12-month continuous eligibility improve children’s health?

Children who have health insurance continuously throughout the year are more likely to have better health. Guaranteeing ongoing coverage ensures that children can receive appropriate preventive care, stay up to date on well-child visits and immunizations, fill their monthly prescriptions, and receive timely treatment for any health issues that arise. Stable coverage also enables providers to establish relationships with children and their parents and to track their health and development.

In contrast, when children experience gaps in health insurance coverage, they are less likely to have access to medical care. Interruptions in coverage can mean that children skip or delay a doctor’s visit or a prescriptions refill. People experiencing gaps in Medicaid coverage often experience serious health problems, while continuous Medicaid coverage is related to better health.

How will continuous eligibility help children with special health care needs?

According to Department of Health analysis, Medicaid children who are blind or disabled have one of the lowest average lengths of Medicaid eligiblity, compared to other eligibility categories. This suggests that children who are blind or disabled may be experiencing disruptions in care or coverage. A policy of 12-month continuous would allow all children, including those who are blind of disabled, to have continous health coverage.

How will continuous eligibility improve health plan accountability and value?

Continuous eligibility allows health plans to more accurately measure the quality of children’s health services and initiate program improvement strategies. Continuous eligibility improves health plan accountability. Health plans use a set of tools, called HEDIS measures (the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set), to assess their performance on health care and service. HEDIS measures require a one-year standard of continuous enrollment data. Children experiencing churn are not captured; HEDIS does not reflect the full make-up of children receiving care. Continuous eligibility leads to more comprehensive program improvement targets and better health care value for enrollees.

Why should Utah implement 12-month continuous eligibility now?

Despite declines in overall uninsured rates, Utah still has one of the highest rates of uninsured children in the nation. Continuous eligibility is a recognized best practice for states to lower their uninsured rate, improve program accountability and value, and assure vulnerable children get the best care.

Continuous eligibility helps retain children with low enrollment rates, including Hispanic children. Hispanic children are more likely to experience churn because of a change in their family’s temporary income status. At least 31% of Hispanic children have parents who lack year-round employment, compared to 18% of White children. Utah has the highest rate of uninsured Hispanic children in the nation. Programs that help children maintain continuous coverage, once they are enrolled, will reduce ethnic health disparities.

Health care leaders and officials urge states to adopt continuous eligibility as one of the top strategies to retain children in insurance programs and strengthen continuity of care.

12-month continuous eligibility is a critical way to make sure that Utah children have health insurance the entire year. All children should have access to health care without gaps or disruptions in coverage.

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pdfSupport 12-Month Continuous Eligibility for Utah Kids with Medicaid

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For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

Published in News & Blog
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Yesterday, Governor Herbert released his annual state budget recommendations.

The staff of Voices for Utah children found several reasons to be encouraged by his proposals.

We support the Governor and his team for their commitment to social services, and our most vulnerable children and families. Specifically, we applaud the Governor’s fiscally-prudent step to support family planning. This will have important benefits for families, including those in intergenerational poverty. With this investment, the state can expect to see savings by 2019. We thank the Governor for his leadership on this issue critical to children and families.

As an organization dedicated to helping all Utah children and families succeed, we believe that our social safety net provides a critical role to help families who have fallen on hard times get back on their feet. As noted in the Budget Recommendations, Utah has a “longstanding social fabric of self-determination.”

Our state budget priorities should support families’ ability to access and utilize public benefits in their time of need. Utah has the highest rate of children who are eligible for CHIP and Medicaid, but not enrolling in public programs. These children are uninsured and not able to benefit from health care services.

As the Governor declares, “the most effective programs, in terms of both quality outcomes and costs, prioritize preventative service delivery.” We strongly support the Governor’s focus. Health insurance coverage is the foundation to build successful prevention initiatives. We must strengthen and support our health insurance programs so that families and children can achieve their optimal health.

We are encouraged by the Governor’s recognition that early childhood is the cornerstone for lifelong learning. We support the Governor’s appropriation for the Baby Watch Early Intervention program as a critical first step. We look forward to seeing the Governor’s 10-year education plan, and hope the Governor will maintain his commitment to early childhood, so that we can establish a strong foundation for children’s healthy development, setting them up for success in school and beyond.

Voices for Utah Children welcomes Governor Herbert’s call in his FY2018 Budget Recommendations to conduct a comprehensive review of the state’s overall tax structure. In the section entitled “Taxation and a Free Market Economy” on page 9-12 (pages 13-16 of the pdf), there is an extended discussion of the trends and challenges facing Utah in terms of taxes and public revenues. The report highlights the downward trend in Utah’s overall level of taxation (including all state and local taxes and fees) and refers to the growing public sentiment that current revenues fall short of meeting the state’s minimum needs. The Governor declares his intention to address this pressing challenge with two concrete actions:
1. “the Governor will be establishing a task force of business leaders and education stakeholders to develop a comprehensive solution that aligns Utah’s tax structure with the modern economy (not just a rate increase), and
2. will request that the Tax Review Commission study and make recommendations regarding the state’s current tax structure, including alternatives for aligning the tax structure with the modern economy and identifying and reviewing tax credits, tax exemptions, tax exclusions, and other preferential tax loopholes.” (page 12)

The Governor and his team should be applauded for addressing these issues so thoughtfully and directly in the Budget Recommendations document and for his intent to convene further study and discussion about how to address this challenge going forward. In other states across the nation and across the political spectrum, the presence or absence of gubernatorial leadership has been a critical factor in determining whether states have been able to address their pressing challenges.

Voices for Utah Children has for a number of years raised the question of whether the current generation of Utahns is doing its part, as earlier generations did, to set aside sufficient resources each year to invest in the building blocks of our future growth and prosperity. Utah’s longstanding commitment to fiscal responsibility should extend beyond balanced budgets and strong bond ratings to also include taking responsibility for making the necessary investments today that reap benefits for future generations in the years and decades to come.

The complete document is available here:

Budget Recommendations Fiscal Year 2018


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

Published in News & Blog

A new study from the Urban Institute shows the alarming impact of a partial repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on children and families. As we recently reported, Utah’s uninsured rates dropped in recent years, due to the provisions of the ACA. But if Congress moves forward with a partial repeal of the ACA in 2017, millions of children and families stand to lose coverage nationwide, and here in Utah.

The report from the Urban Institute looks at the partial repeal bill that Congress passed and President Obama vetoed in 2016. The report found:

  • The number of uninsured children would more than double nationwide. More than 4 million could lose coverage. Nationally, the child uninsured rate would jump from an all time low of 4% to 9%.
  • Here in Utah, 273,000 Utahns could lose health insurance leaving an estimated 601,000 adults and children uninsured under the reconciliation bill.
  • Utah stands to lose billions of dollars in state and federal heath care dollars, which will have a dramatic impact on the our state budget and the strength of our safety net.
  • Uncompensated care will increase pressures on state and local governments, as providers seek to meet the growing number of uninsured.

Repealing the ACA without a replacement strategy is not a plan; it’s a risky step that threatens the health and well-being of children and families. Endangering their health without a clear and sound path forward is unsafe and unwise.

For more information, read the complete report:

Implications of Partial Repeal of the ACA through Reconciliation


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

Published in News & Blog